Located right in the centre of the desert, Australia’s Red Centre, Alice Springs is the biggest town and the jumping-off point for exploring the Aussie outback, the Larapinta Trail, Uluru, and more. The Arrernte (Alice Spring’s Aboriginal population) calls the location Mparntwe. It has been their home for more than fifty thousand years! If you are visiting Alice Springs for the first time, you can be sure that there is a lot to see and do. It is surprising for many people because of its remote location: Indigenous culture, museums, national parks and desert, etc.

Top Travel Destinations in Alice Springs

Alice Springs is a stellar destination for outdoor enthusiasts and individuals who are looking for a cultural experience. Here are several recommended attractions:

  • Uluru (Ayers Rock): Ayers Rock is an impressive landmark in Australia. It features a huge chunk of sandstone and is a six-hour drive from Alice Springs. A true monolith, the rock juts up about 350m from its barren surrounds. Amazingly, the rock extends even further than this amount below ground.
  • Kata Tjuta (The Olgas): The Olgas is an often-understated facet of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. It features a set of impressive domes that are believed to originate from a similar time as Ayers Rock. The Olgas comprises of 36 formations and have been weathered over millions of years. The highest point of Mount Olga is approximately 546m above ground.
  • Larapinta Trail: Six days of hiking can start at the old Alice Springs telegraph station. It passes through waterholes, creeks, gorges, and deserts.
  • The Olive Pink Botanic Garden: Located in the middle of Alice Springs, the Olive Pink Botanic Garden features 600 different Australian plants. Visitors are allowed to take a walk and catch a glimpse of kangaroos and other wildlife hanging out.
  • Alice Springs Desert Park: This is an environmental education facility that contains native animals and plants from the central Australian desert environments. The Alice Springs Desert Park offers visitors the opportunity to explore the inter-relationships between the people, animals, and plants.
  • Finke Gorge National Park: Finke Gorge is a national park that is recognized for its Aboriginal cultural sites and ancient palms. It is home to one of the oldest catchments in the world and Palm Valley. The latter comprises of a diverse range of plant species such as the Livistona Mariae or red cabbage palm. There are nearly 3,000 adult palms and thousands of juveniles here.
  • Araluen Arts Centre: Araluen is the epicentre of Alice Springs’ visual art and performance scene. From snug professional theatres to little galleries, visitors can appreciate contemporary Aboriginal art. The centre is built around a 300-year-old Corkwood Tree and is home to the Sculpture Garden, which is a sacred site for the local Arrernte people.
  • Mbantua Aboriginal Art Gallery: This is one of the more popular galleries for tourists. It makes an excellent starting point if you are looking to get a feel for the local style. The works of more than 200 local artists are featured in the gallery. Definitely worth a stop if you happen to pass through Todd St Mall.

Luxury Accommodation in Alice Springs

Although Alice Springs is located near to the Outback, visitors will still be able to find some of the most comfortable accommodations in Australia. Here are some of the available options:

  • Mercure Alice Springs Resort
  • Crowne Plaza Alice Springs Lasseters
  • DoubleTree by Hilton
  • Aurora Alice Springs
  • ibis Styles Alice Springs Oasis
  • Desert Palms Alice Springs

Airports in Alice Springs for Private Jet Charter

Although Alice Springs is a remote location, you can still rest assured that there are airports located reasonably close to it. These airports help provide travellers a hassle-free and convenient travel experience.

  • Darwin International Airport: Located 8km from the Darwin city centre, this is the tenth busiest airport in Australia. It features an international terminal, a domestic terminal and a cargo terminal. Darwin has the capacity to serve more than 1.7 million passengers annually. With an average mean sea level of 31m, the airport features two asphalt runways designated in the 11/29 and 18/36 direction.
  • Adelaide Airport: It is the main airport of Adelaide and the fifth busiest airport in Australia. It services more than eight million passengers annually and is operated by Adelaide Airport Limited. The airport houses one terminal and two asphalt runways designated in the 05/23 and 12/30 direction. Adelaide Airport is also located approximately 6 km west of the city-centre of Adelaide and has a mean sea level of about 6m.
  • Presidente Nicolau Lobato International Airport: Presidente Nicolau Lobato was formerly known as Comoro International Airport. Located in the capital of East Timor – Dili, the airport is operated by the East Timor Civil Aviation Division. The airport sits on top of a mean sea level of 8m and features a single asphalt runway designated in the 08/26 direction.
  • Jacksons International Airport: Located 8km outside Port Moresby, Jacksons International Airport is the busiest and largest airport in Papua New Guinea. As the principal hub of Air Niugini, Jacksons consists of two terminals: one international and one domestic. The international terminal houses four aircraft parking bays and some of them are equipped with aerobridges. The airport features a single asphalt runway that is designated in the 14/32 direction.
  • Port Hedland International Airport: Owned by the Town of Port Hedland Council, Port Hedland International Airport is located 11km from South Hedland and 9.3km south-east of Port Hedland. Since its inception, it has been an important airport for passengers who work in the mining industry. The airport is constructed 10m above mean sea level and features two chipseal runways designated in the 14/32 and 18/36 direction.

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